Player claims Muswellbrook’s $1.3m Saturday Lotto prize

12/12/2018 Posted by admin

AFTER five days, a NSW Lotteries player has come forward to claim the $1.3m prize from Saturday Lotto $20 Million Superdraw that was won with an entry bought from Muswellbrook’s Southside Newsagency.
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The 36-game QuickPick entry won Muswellbrook’s newest millionaire a division one prize of $1,333,333.34.

But, just who exactly landed the windfall will remain a mystery, as the winner has spoken to NSW Lotteries in secret to claim their cash bonanza.

NSW Lotteries spokesperson Matt Hart said while all Saturday Lotto customers dreamt of becoming an overnight millionaire, the winning Muswellbrook ticket had made that dream a reality for another player this week.

“We speak with winners every day and while most winners dream of winning big, many don’t ever expect it will happen to them,” he said.

“In fact since July 1 this year, there have already been 77 division one winning entries purchased by NSW Lotteries customers – that’s a lot of winning smiles on the faces of players.”

The division one winning entry was purchased from Southside Newsagency in Maitland Road.

Southside Newsagency owner Pankaj Monga said the store was excited that it had sold a division one winning ticket.

“Congratulations to the winner! It’s great that our missing millionaire has come forward to claim their prize,” he said.

“We’ve been really busy this week with a lot of people coming into the store to check their tickets because they had heard that we’d sold a division one winning entry.”

NSW Lotteries reminds players of the importance of registering their tickets to a Players Club Card so all of their prizes are secure and they can be contacted directly with the good news of a big win.

Ninja Warriors get a grip in Newcastlevideos, photos

12/12/2018 Posted by admin

Ninja Warriors get a grip in Newcastle | videos, photos NEW CHALLENGE: Snowboarder Stephanie Magiros, who competed at the 2014 Sochi Olympics, races at Ninja Parc Cooks Hill on Thursday night. Picture: Jonathan Carroll
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BALANCING ACT: Elite competitor Josh O’Sullivan warms up before Thursday night’s race.

HANGING TOUGH: Newcastle teenager Xanthea Vazey.

Stephanie Magiros

Tommy Leung

April Mutton

Xanthea Vazey

Gemma Rolfe

Elite competitors warm up.

Ryan Phillips

Ben Sillay

Josh O’Sullivan

Elite winner Josh Gray on the podium.

Michael Gleeson

Michael Gleeson

TweetFacebookAmerican Ninja Warrior.

Some of the competitors from that series, including former army fitness instructor Michael Gleeson, flexed their muscles at Ninja Park Cooks Hill, formerly known as Howzat, on Thursday.

14-year-old Xanthea Vazey shows how it’s doneAlso competing was Olympic snowboarder and former gymnast Stephanie Magiros, of Sydney, and Newcastle bouldering youth national titleholder Ben Abel.

But 24-year-old Josh Gray upstaged them all, completing the Ninja Parc in three minutes and 22 seconds.

Also on the podium in the elite category were two bolters from Cardiff, 30-year-old rigger and vegetarian Reuban Keeley and 26-year-old gymnastics and fitness instructor Ryan Phillips.

Kotara High student Xanthea Vazey, 14, who trains six times a week at Pulse Climbing, was second against a field of adult men and women in the open category.

Ninja Parc regular April Mutton was third, behind winner Matt Turner.

Stephanie Magiros conquers an obstacle.“I’ve pushed myself as a snowboarder,I’ve pushed myself as a gymnast, and now I get to push myself as a ninja,” Magiros said.

Gray took home a cheque for $1000 in what Ninja Parc managing director John Pirlo said would be the first of many races at the venue.

Man jailed for 11 months after bashing a kangaroo to death in Bunbury

12/12/2018 Posted by admin

A man was jailed for 11 months after bashing a kangaroo in near Bunbury. Photo: ABC NewsA man who brutally bashed a kangaroo to death with a crowbar with another man near Bunbury will spend almost a year behind bars.
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Craig Jamie House and Vance Geoffrey Jarvis, who represented themselves in court, both pleaded guilty in the Bunbury Magistrates Court on Tuesday to ill-treatment of an animal, according to the ABC.

Mr House was jailed for 11 months’ while Jarvis was ordered to pay a $10,000 fine.

It’s believed to be the first ever jail sentence for someone charged with animal cruelty in WA.

The court was shown confronting video footage of the kangaroos’ death in June 2015, which police found on a computer after raiding a home on an unrelated matter.

The video showed the two men and a dog collaring the kangaroo into a dam before House strikes the roo with a crowbar before dragging the animal’s lifeless body from the dam.

Magistrate Evan Shackleton said House struck the first blow to the kangaroo and instructed Jarvis to join in, according to the ABC.

“Sneak out to it man, as soon as it lunges ‘boosh’, take ya thongs off,” House can be heard yelling to Jarvis.

House told the court he killed the kangaroo for food because he had fallen on hard times and used the metal bar because his gun license was confiscated two years earlier.

“I tried to put out the roo in the most humanely way I could,” House told the court.

The magistrate disagreed with House claiming there were “large elements of animal cruelty”.

“In my view, you were having fun tormenting that kangaroo,” he said.

RSPCA WA chief executive David van Ooran told the ABC it was it was “incredibly rare” for someone to be given a jail term for animal cruelty.

“I can’t think of a time in recent years and decades where this has occurred,” Mr van Ooran said.

“This is a very strong penalty and a very appropriate penalty … it was clearly a horrific and sickening act against a defenceless animal, behaviour like this is completely unacceptable.

“It’s excellent to see that the magistrate in this case has awarded a prison term.”

WAtoday

Jets officials hoping for a vocal F3 derby crowd on Sunday

13/03/2019 Posted by admin

PASSIONATE: Jets officials are hopeful fans turn out in strong numbers for the two F3 derby games against Central Coast. Picture: Jonathan CarrollNEWCASTLE Jets chief executive Lawrie McKinna believes Sunday’s showdown with Central Coast at McDonald Jones Stadium is shaping as the most significant F3 derby since the 2008 grand final.
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“It probably is,’’ said McKinna, who coached the Mariners in their title-deciding 1-0 loss to Newcastle nine years ago.

“It’s probably the most at stake since the grand final.

“It’s a crucial game. We’re both still chasing a top-six spot and I can’t remember the last time that was the case.’’

With six rounds remaining, the Jets are seventh, three points adrift of sixth-placed Western Sydney.

The Mariners are ninth, on 19 points, and will need a minor miracle to reach the play-offs if Newcastle beat them on Sunday.

McKinna was hopeful the “reciprocal rights” arrangement between the two clubs –by which members can attend derby games at their opponents’ ground free of charge –would ensure healthy turnouts on Sunday and forthe round-26 clash at Gosford on Sunday, April 9.

“The first derby game we had [in round seven], there were 937 Mariners memberswho came up and used the deal that was set up, plus there were a few hundred other Central Coast fans there too,’’ he said.

“So it was the biggest Mariners support up here for many years.

“Obviously a lot of them willcoming back up here this week, so it’s important that we can match that support.

“And hopefully when we go to Gosford, we get more of our members using their reciprocal rights than the Mariners did. We’ve got close to 9000 members, and it would be nice to get as many of them using free entry as possible, so we can beat the Mariners’ number.’’

Occasionally in the past, clashes between the Jets and Mariners have been overshadowed by unsavoury incidents involving supporters.

But McKinna saw no need to remind spectators of their obligations, despite the controversy caused by Western Sydney fans unfurling a homophobic banner during last week’s derby win against Sydney.

“It’s not even an issue,’’ McKinna said.

“It’s just a normal game to us, although perhaps a lot more noisy –hopefully coming from Jets fans.

“But we’ve had no issues with security or crowd behaviour at our stadium all season. We just expect our fans to turn up and help create a good, noisy atmopshere, because the boys need their support.’’

Jets officials are hoping for a crowd of at least 11,000 on Sunday.

Settling in with changes

13/03/2019 Posted by admin

Northern Settlement Services Ltd (NSS) is a not-for-profit organisation supporting migrants and refugees for over 30 years, facilitating their successful settlement into n life in an environment sensitive and responsive to their needs.
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HELPING HAND: NSS is a not-for-profit organisation assisting in the settlement of refugees & migrants in Newcastle, Hunter, Central Coast and New England.

NSS has been delivering Aged Care Services since 1995 and has embraced the many changes to Aged Care so that our elderly have greater choice and flexibility in the care and services they receive.

ADAPTING: Northern Settlement Services has been quick to embrace the new changes to Home Care and how it will affect existing and potentlal future clients.

NSS has been actively engaging with our consumers to get abreast of the changes the n Government is bringing in, because everyone’s circumstances and preferences are unique.

“The most important thing older people and their families can do is to acquaint themselves with the choices available, so they know what they want and can plan for it,” CEO Lulu Tantos said.

From February 27, people will have greater choice and control over their futures, with a bigger range of services available to help stay independent in their own homes and communities.

NSS has the experience and is well place in delivering Aged Care Services across the Hunter and Central Coast. Our programs include:

Home Care PackagesCommunity Visitors SchemeMulticultural Social Support Program (Chinese, Vietnamese, Filipino, Spanish speaking, Tongan and Samoan groups)Hunter Multicultural Respite ServiceSector Support and DevelopmentBroadband for SeniorsOur staff are a dedicated group of professionals who are culturally responsive and sensitive to the needs of older ns to best meet their needs in this “new world” of Aged Care.

Client feedback is positive. One said:“The co-ordinator is very friendly plus she is very passionate about her job and especially we have learnt a lot today about other services and systems that we have not heard of or known before.”

Another observed: “A Home Care Package recipient was being assessed by an external Allied Health Professional who conveyed that both the carer and family members stated how happy they were with the services they received from NSS. They requested to continue with NSS as their Level 4 provider.”

For more information visit www.nsservices苏州夜总会招聘.au or call 4969 3399.

Awabakal’s programs tailored to fit

13/03/2019 Posted by admin

TRANSFORMING: Awabakal has implemented solutions to ensure that the consumer has more freedom of choice and control when it comes to the services they receive.Since 1977 Awabakal has been providing primary health care, aged care, children and family services to Indigenous people living throughout the Newcastle, Lake Macquarie, Port Stephens and Hunter Valley regions
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DELIVERING GREATER CHOICE: Changes to Home Care packages are all about what the consumer wants and needs.

Home Care reforms mean Awabakal’s Home and Community Care (HACC) service has transitioned to the Commonwealth Home Support Programme (CHSP) and the Community Aged Care Package (CACP) is now referred to as Home Care Packages (HCP).

The new programs have been designed to allow consumers to play a part in determining what they want from a service provider.

TRUSTED COMMUNITY PARTNER: Awabakal provided primary health care, aged care, children and family services to local Indigenous people.

“Our new programs allow for individuals to have greater control over the types of services they receive and the delivery of those services,” Awabakal chief executive officer Raylene Gordon said.

“Consumers can also determine the level of involvement they have in managing their package and they have the flexibility to change the package as their needs change.

“Awabakal’s services are unique as recipients also have access to additional ‘wrap around’ services offered by the organisation.

“This incorporates general practitioner, allied health and dental services, along with specialist services and education programs.

“When you access our Home Care programs through Awabakal Aged Care Services, you receive an integrated health approach that is supported by the entire Awabakal team.”

For more information on Awabakal Aged Care Services or to discuss your needs phone 02 4907 8537 or email [email protected]苏州模特佳丽招聘.

It’s your life and now it’s your choice

13/03/2019 Posted by admin

HAPPY AT HOME: Many people would prefer to live independently at home as they get older and the new changes will help people choose their providers.
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The changes to Home Care which will give people freedom to choose their service provider and move to a different provider.

For organisations like Novacare the changes mean more people can access their services.

“NovaCare can now provide Home Care Packages across the Hunter especially in the Newcastle, Port Stephens and Lake Macquarie areas,” CEO Joseph McCarthy said.

Novacare specialises in supporting people to continue to live at home and be part of their local communities and was named Organisation of the Year by Aged & Community Services NSW/ACT at the State Awards for Excellence 2016.

”The award was judged on excellent service, with a focus on innovation and Mr McCarthy believes being local matters.

“We are not a call centre – our office is in Broadmeadow.We are independent, flexible, close at hand and know everyone personally.”

Novacare prides itself on thinking outside the square to help people live their way, utilising the “wrap around” approach.

“We look at life from all angles, so no matter who you are and what stage of life you’re at, we’re with you all the way,” Mr McCarthy said.

“I don’t think any other other organisation in Newcastle can offer such choice with our home, social and respite services.”

Novacare owns Milpara Centre in Merewether with a full calendar of events and bus trips.

“One 91-year old lady has house keeping, mowing, garden maintenance, help with shopping and appointments, and is picked up and taken to Milpara for craft, socialising, exercise, and outings,” Mr McCarthy. “Last week they visited Lake Macquarie Art Gallery followed by lunch overlooking the lake.”

Novacarealso owns Respite Cottage in Hamilton which offers guests day, overnight and extended care with private bedrooms and bathrooms. It is the only cottage of it’s kind in Newcastle.

When looking for a service provider Mr McCarthy advises to focus on one who can support your choices, interests, needs and personality.

“It’s your life and it’s your choice,” he said.

For more infoabout Novacare, call 1300 363 654.

Drayton South proposed open-cut mine rejected for the fourth time

13/03/2019 Posted by admin

END OF THE LINE: A symbolic display of miners’ clothing in late 2015 in support of the Drayton South open-cut coal project, which has again been rejected by the Planning Assessment Commission. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers.THE horse industry says the sort of legislation that permanently banned the proposed Bickham coalmine near Scone is needed to stop the Drayton South proposal once and for all.
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The NSW Planning Assessment Commission issued its latest formal refusal of the Drayton South project on Thursday, saying that after weighing up the merits of the mine and the nearby horse studs it found that Anglo American’s application was not in the public interest.

Environmentalists cheered the result, saying it was the fourth time the mine had been rejected, in the form of two PAC refusals, and two reviews of those refusals.

Anglo American said it would not comment before fully reading the decision but with only a small crew doing rehabilitation work atthe original Drayton open-cut since it closed late last year, the future of the site is looking grim from a mining perspective.

Dr Cameron Collinsof theHunter Thoroughbred Breeders Association said the Upper Hunter community had been through “years of assessment” on Drayton South, and that enough was enough.

But he said that unless the NSW government enacted a site-specific State Environmental Planning Policy or SEPP of the type that it did to stop the Bickham proposed open-cut near Scone in 2010, there would be nothing to stop Anglo or a future owner lodging another application for Drayton South.

“The Government, with a stroke of a pen, can end the uncertainty by putting a SEPP on this on this site to prohibit future mining,” Dr Collins said on Thursday.

In its report on the Drayton South application, the PAC members said the mine would employ up to 500 people a year,provide $355,000 a year to Muswellbrook Shire Council, $233 million over the life of the mine in state royalties and $93 million in company tax.

Although the NSW Department of Planning and Environment supported the project, the PAC said there would be a decline in the thoroughbred industry cluster in the area –led by Coolmore and Godolphin studs – together with a “less diversified and less sustainable economy in the Hunter Valley” if the project went ahead.

It did not accept the company and department view that the mine would have no negative impacts on the “operations and reputations” of the two big studs, sayingdust and blast noise would be likely to “adversely affect” their operations.

Mining and horseswere “co-existing . . . at this current point in time” but“the proximity of the project . . . would tip this relationship out of balance to the detriment and ultimate decline” of the Hunter equine industry.

Putting people in control

13/02/2019 Posted by admin

POSITIVE: The changes will give greater choice, control and flexibility in the way people receive home care services, and how those services are delivered.
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As of February 27, elderly residents in Newcastle and the Hunter will have significantly more choice about the care they receive at home and who delivers it through changes to government-subsidised home-care packages.

FLEXIBLE: From February 27, 2017, if you have a home care package, it will be easier to change providers if you are looking for a better fit.

Rather than allocating funding to registered home-care providers, home-care packages offering services to keep older people living independently in their own home (such as personal care, domestic assistance and social support) will be assigned directly to individuals who can then choose the provider they feel best meets their needs.

Allocating funding directly to an individual means they are now free to “shop around”to determine who they would like to deliver their services, not simply a provider who has a package available.

MOBILE: If you choose to change service providers, your home-care package funding will move to your new service provider.

It also frees consumers who are not happy with their current provider to be able to change providers easily.

This is good news for the 3500 residents aged 65 years and over across Newcastle and the Hunter who already receive services under a home-care package, and the growing number of residents who may be eligible in the future.

Leading local home-care provider, Sue Mann Nursing &Community Care managing director Andrew Mann says the changes are a great outcome for older people of Newcastle and the Hunter.

“Independence, choice and control are all very important for people as they age and working through the options for care is a big decision,” Mr Mann said. “Providing consumers and their families with choice means they are in control of choosing the provider that delivers services in their home.”

Sue Mann Nursing & Community Care have developed some “Top Tips” to help select the right home care provider:

Do your research: Check they are a registered provider, look at their websites, clients testimonials, talk with people you know who may use their service and determine a short-list.

Have a conversation: Call the provider and ask them some questions about their company (how long have they been established, experience of staff, quality of care) together with how they run their packages (eg. fee structure, service options) Meet with them – organise for the provider to come to visit so you can get a sense of how you feel with them in your home. Meeting a provider will also give you a sense of their professionalism.

Compare providers: Look at several different providers so you can make an informed choice about the type of provider you are looking for and who might be the best fit for you.

If you’re considering home care or would like more information about home-care packages, contact myagedcare, either via the website at www.myagedcare苏州夜总会招聘.au or call 1800 200 422.

EDITORIAL: How much to pay people for working on Sundays

13/02/2019 Posted by admin

AT its essence, the debate about penalty rates centres on the appropriate level towhich employees should be compensated for working outside of normal hours.
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But as the Fair Work Commission points out in the opening sections of itshistoric decision to cut Sunday and public holiday penalty rates in six hospitality and retail awards, penalty rates were originally as much about deterring employers from scheduling work outside “normal hours” as it was to compensate employees for working them.

Hence, it would seem, the name “penalty rates”. But as the commission notes, things have changed so much since then that “deterrence” is no longer a “relevant consideration” in setting weekend and Sunday penalty rates. Old notions of a time to work, and a time to rest (with the country sliding to a near halt on the Sabbath)are more or less irrelevant in a society where many of us,especially in cities, want our retail and hospitality providers open seven days a week, if not around the clock.

And if we expect those retailers to open, we must accept that they need to be able to trade at a profit to do so. With the commission proposing to cut the affected penalties by up to 25 per cent, the question is whether these reductions in individual earnings will lead to more work overall –and so a greater benefit to more people –or whether it will embolden employers to seek further rate cuts, in the same way that a once “progressive” tax system has become progressively flattened.

In examining the pros and cons of this decision, there is no doubt that many of those affected are in low-paying jobs. As such, they are likely to rely heavilyon the extra income from Sunday shifts. But as various media investigations have shown in recent years, a number of employers –some of them high-profile –are already paying well under the going rate, regardless of what the law says. In other situations, unions and employers have voluntarily agreed to ease weekend penalties in exchange for higher general hourly rates of pay, arguing that such arrangements meet the commission’s “better off overall” test.

In hindsight, not all of these deals have worked out well for employees. With this in mind, the commission should keep a very close eye on the impacts of this decision, and be prepared to reverse it if the benefits promised by employers do not eventuate.

ISSUE: 38,475

Knights winger Ken Sio is confident he can match it with Warriors legend Manu Vatuvei

13/02/2019 Posted by admin

FOR more than a decade, Manu Vatuvei has terrorised and trampled those unfortunate enough to play rightwing for the Newcastle Knights.
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TRY TIME: Ken Sio at the Auckland Nines.

Now the jobof taming the “Beast” in Newcastle’s season-opening clash with the Warriors at Mount Smart Stadium on Sunday week has been handed to new recruit Ken Sio.

HARD YARDS: Ken Sio at training.

FEARSOME: Manu Vatuvei

As first assignments go, they don’t get much tougher. In 19 games against Newcastle, Vatuvei has scored 19 tries –more than any other opposition player in history.

SMILING ASSASSIN: Manu Vatuvei

The next best against the Knights is champion Melbourne fullback BillySlater, whose 23 games have yielded 17tries.

In his past 11games against Newcastle, Vatuvei has crossed the stripe 14times, including three doubles and a hat-trick.

Yet if players such as Akuila Uate and Jake Mamo have struggled to contain the fearsome 30-year-old, Sio can at least enter the game with a degree of confidence.

During his 57 games for Parramatta, before two years with Hull Kingston Rovers in Super League, Sio marked up against Vatuvei twice.

In their first clash, in 2012, the Warriors won 36-20 but Sio picked up a try and kept Vatuvei scoreless.

A year later, Sio crossed for a double in Parramatta’s 40-10 win and again Vatuvei’s name did not feature on the scoresheet.

In other words, the score is 3-0 to Sio after two games.

At 189 centimetres and 109 kilograms, Vatuvei will hold a significant size advantage over 26-year-old Sio (185cm and 95kg).

Yet Sio said he relies on an old-fashioned approach when lining up against the 28-Test Kiwi international: “He’s a big bloke, but the same for everyone who gets tackled, you can’t run without your legs.’’

Sio admitted stopping Vatuvei would be easier if the Knights can “get numbers in the tackle’’ and not allow him space to wind up.

“He’s a legend of the game and it will be awesome to come up against him again,’’ he said.

“I went all right last time, but I didn’t really have to tackle him front-on.

“That would be a pretty scary thing to have to do, but it would be a good challenge as well.’’

It will be the first time Sio has played at Mount Smart Stadium, where the Knights have won just one of their past 11 games.

“The last time I was there [with Parramatta], I had a bit of a shoulder problem and was 18thman,’’ he said.

“So this will be the first time I’ve played there in the NRL.

“But even playing in reserve grade, it’s always a tough place to play.’’

Sio has settled in quickly since joining the Knights in October, scoring a try in the Auckland Nines and also last week’s 44-0 trial thrashing of Canberra.

“It’s a good feeling to come back home [to ],’’ he said.

“The boys have made me feel welcome and Newcastle is an awesome place to live.’’

Vatuvei, with 152 tries, is equal 10thon rugby league’s all-time tryscoring tally.

Sio has a handy strike rate in his own right, scoring 37 times in 57 top-grade games for the Eels.

South Coast defeats Hunterin CHS girls cricket championship final

13/02/2019 Posted by admin

RUNNERS UP: The Hunter open girls cricket team with coach Peter Hosking fell at the final hurdle in Thursday’s CHS Championship final.The Hunter put in their worst batting display of the carnival to fall to South Coast in the CHS Girls Cricket Championship final on Thursday.
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A combination of good bowling and fielding and some rash shots saw the Hunter dismissed for 45 and effectively out of the contest.

However, the Hunter girls dug deep and had South Coast six wickets down before the southern team passed the small total.

Both teams had gone into the final undefeated and Hunter coach Peter Hosking said the batting collapse was a disappointing way to end their campaign.

鈥淲e were probably guilty of the girls not putting enough value on their wickets and knuckling down into an innings,鈥?Hoskingsaid.

鈥淪outh Coast bowled well and put a lot of pressure on in the field.

鈥淚 think the girls showed their true character in the way they fought back by taking six wickets before South Coast passed the target.鈥?/p>Hosking said he was extremely proud of his team鈥檚on-field efforts, sportsmanship and terrific behaviour.

鈥淭hey did their schools and the zone very proud, they were a great bunch of girls to coach,鈥?he said.

Hunter beaten in CHS girls cricket final | PHOTOS South Coast’s Jessica Marsh looks to go on the attack against Riverina in Wednesday’s semi-final. South Coast won the game and meet Hunter in the final on Thursday. Picture: Michael Hartshron

South Coast’s Naomi Woods plays an attacking shot. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast’s Naomi Woods plays an attacking shot. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

South Coast v Riverina on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney North v Sydney East on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney North v Sydney East on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney North v Sydney East on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney North v Sydney East on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney North v Sydney East on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney North v Sydney East on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney North v Sydney East on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney North v Sydney East on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney North v Sydney East on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney North v Sydney East on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney North v Sydney East on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney North v Sydney East on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney North v Sydney East on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney North v Sydney East on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney North v Sydney East on Wednesday. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Maitland’s Jasmine Goode (centre) high-fives teammates after running out Sydney South-West’s Hanne Sorensen. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

The Hunter’s Jasmine Goode, from Maitland, sends down a delivery against Sydney South-West. Picture: Max Mason Hubers

Hunter keeper Anita Handono takes a diving catch. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Sydney South-West’s Hanne Sorensen scrambles to make a run. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Sydney South-West’s Hanne Sorensen sprints to try to make her ground. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Sydney South-West’s Hanne Sorensen is run out after risking one too many quick runs. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Sydney South-West’s Hannah Darlington jogs in to complete a run. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Hunter’s Jasmine Goode waits for the return of the ball from the outfield. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Hunter bowler Jasmine Goode, from Maitland. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Hunter bowler Jasmine Goode, from Maitland. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Sydney South-West’s Hannah Darlington and Eliza Mallitt react after falling short against the Hunter. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

Girls from the Hunter and Sydney South-West teams shake hands after the game.

Hunter players Jordan Johnson and Trudi Peterson from Hunter Sports High. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter teammates Mollie Mullen and Kirsten Smith from Scone High and Jess Hjort from Toronto High.

Mollie Mullen from Scone and Cassidy Baker from Maitland. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter players Kirsten Smith and Alison McGrath. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter players (back row) Mollie Mullens, Abbey Taylor, Jasmine Goode, Nell Gibson and Millie Kohl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Riverina player Lilly Tassell from Hay. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Rikki and Ebony Hoskin from Howlong, near Albury.

Sydney East players enjoy the shade during their game against Sydney West. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter batsman Kirsten Smith plays a shot down leg.

Hunter batsman Allison McGrath. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

North Coast v Hunter. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

North Coast v Hunter. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

North Coast v Hunter. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter batsman Kirsten Smith plays a straight drive. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter’s Kirsten Smith. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter’s Allison McGrath. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter’s Allison McGrath. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Riverina batsman Delilah Crighton. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Riverina batsman Delilah Crighton. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Riverina v North West. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Riverina v North West. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Riverina v North West. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Riverina v North West. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Riverina v North West. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Riverina v North West. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Riverina v North West. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Riverina v North West. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Riverina v North West. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Riverina v North West. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Riverina v North West. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Riverina v North West. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West’s Kanaan Darshana after taking a wicket. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West’s Kanaan Darshana is congratulated by teammates after taking a wicket. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West’s Kanaan Darshana is congratulated by teammates after taking a wicket. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West’s Kanaan Darshana is congratulated by teammates after taking a wicket. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Sydney West v Sydney Eastl. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

Hunter v North Coast. Picture: Michael Hartshorn

TweetFacebookHosking praised the facilities at Maitland Park.

Mayor criticised over her $270 childcare bill

14/01/2019 Posted by admin

Holding firm: Mayor Nuatali Nelmes said she had no choice but to take her daughter with her on the overseas trip.THE state’s local government minister has hit out at the “wasteful” use of public money afterreports Newcastle Lord Mayor Nuatali Nelmescharged ratepayers $270 for childcare while on an overseas junket.
苏州桑拿会所

But Cr Nelmes has defended the decision, saying the trip was taken “at very short notice” during school holidays and that she “wouldn’t have been able to attend” without taking her nine-year-old daughter.

News Corporation reported on Thursday thatCr Nelmes billed ratepayers forone day of childcare for her daughter while on a council trip to Singapore last year, despite the council’s chief executive warning her to consider how the expense would fare against the “pub test”.

In an email to Cr Nelmes’ office the council’s interim boss Frank Cordingley warned the lord mayor to “consider how this request would pass the “pub test”.

“In terms of how the ratepayers of Newcastle would regard her actions of taking her daughter with her on an overseas trip to attend a conference, and was then “minded” at the ratepayers expense while the Lord Mayor attended the conference,” Mr Cordingley wrote.

The decision has drawn criticism from her opponents on council, with Brad Luke, a Liberal Party councillor, sayinghe didn’t think it was an appropriate use of ratepayers money.

“I don’t think the averageperson would say that it’s appropriate, it’s as simple as that,” he said.

But Cr Nelmes defended the decision, saying she had no choice but to take her daughter with her on the trip and that she was “pretty confident” the $270 billwas the only time she had used a carers expense in the current term.

Under local government expenses rules, Cr Nelmes is allowed to claim up to $6000 a year in childcare costs.

Cr Nelmes has three children, and told theNewcastle Heraldshe had used her carer allowance while attending meetings in previous terms “when the kids were very young”.

She said she would not have taken her daughter on the trip if it was not school holidays at the time.

“I can’t just ask my husband to take a week off work because I have to go away on council business,” she said.

Asked about the claim the NSW local government minister Gabrielle Upton said; “ratepayer funds should never be wasted on unnecessary expenses”.

“The community has a right to set high expectations for their councils to spend ratepayers’ money appropriately,” she said.

The ministerstopped short of saying she would order an investigation, saying concerned ratepayers could lodge complaintswith the department.